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Saturday, August 21, 2010

What U Talkin About, Phelan? Pitbulls and Strippers are not Our Problems!!!

I want to dive into two recent topics in the news and propose a different slant on the story.

1. The Insane Pitbull Ordinance
2. The Unreasonable Freak out over the Lynn Restaurant Association President

I'm sure you read my notes on the council meeting that dealt with the Pitbull Ordinance. I personally think time wasted on this topic is an extreme waste of taxpayer money. Our Mayor is now spending her time having to research legal issues surrounding an ordinance which is going to be inneffective anyway! The problem is still going to be present. We're still going to have one dog officer in a city of 90,000. We're still going to have #$%^head owners!! Why are we doing this? Oh wait, there's a Mayoral race coming up in a few years and guess who is running? (Keep this at the front of your mind, whenever you get scared by something in the paper!!!) Oh man, this is going to get me called in to the principal's office again, I can feel it.

Ok, now let's move on to an even more insane topic. The Lynn Restaurant Association President recently allegedly inquired into adult entertainment. Just looking for information we're now told. He never submitted anything so there was nothing to withdraw. He just had to come out with some insane public statement because Phelan made such a huge deal about it in the local press. Now, I don't want a strip club here either. That's why the lord gave us Providence, RI.

I would much rather our city council be focused on actual problems. A freakin' Ordinance Committee was called for this past Tuesday so that they could lay down a public hearing on this. Insane! We think that hearing will be on Sept 7th (not confirmed yet). What exactly are we debating? What else does Phelan have a problem with that could potentially maybe someday come to Lynn? Maybe we should lay down pointless hearings for all of those things as well?

People will show up to this hearing to shout and scream about how bad strip clubs are and I completely agree, but guess what y'all? There isn't one even proposed for the City of Lynn. This is a waste of our time. Fix what makes certain sections of Lynn an obvious place to put a strip club and then we'll be good.

ECONOMIC AND RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

CRIME
EDUCATION

Let's get our priorities in order Council. You are not gaining a vote from this Downtowner, Phelan. I know you're fooling a bunch of others. Earn the votes fairly. Stop the fear mongering in the local paper (they do that just fine without you) and let's move forward on what really matters for the City of Lynn.

Pitbulls and Strippers (not our problems).

-Corey

14 comments:

  1. I see a pattern at work here, I won't say what it indicates, but your assessment is certainly plausible. A couple of years ago the pastor of a church in East Lynn inquired about building a halfway house for sex offenders in Lynn. Phelan vocally came out against it and proposed ordinances to stop it from happening. The Item had a field day. Turns out the pastor was also just looking for information, no permits had been applied for.
    So what do sex offenders, pitbull attacks and strip clubs all have in common? Touchy subjects to be sure and easily sensationalized, they hit a nerve with voters and play on our fears. It's us against them.
    Since coming to Lynn, I've learned that solving problems by merely writing new laws does little to change the problem behavior.

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  2. As a member of the ELCA board, I have sat in on a number of conversations evolved around Pit Bulls. As a dog lover and owner, I can also admit that if I were walking down the street and saw a Pit Bull unleashed coming my way, I would freeze. Doing nothing about the over 31 Pit Bull attacks since 1/1/2010 is not a solution. Neither is proposing to muzzle ALL dogs because of one breed. Will it take a death of a child to do something? There are Lynn residents afraid to walk Lynn Beach because of the Pit Bulls. To propose a solution to a real problem is not fear mongering. The problem is not the number of dog officers, it is the number of Pit Bull attacks.

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  3. With all due respect, I disagree wih you, Corey. While I don't think the proposed pit bull ordinance is the correct combination to correct the problem, I disagree that this is an "insane" topic. When people and animals are attacked walking down the street or on the beach, something needs to be done. Obviously Lynn is not the only city wrangling with this issue. Perhaps more discussion is needed to figure out how to get all Lynn dogs registered, and how to get more funding for more staff, but I believe it's a real issue and not one just manufactured for political reasons.

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  4. Insane ordinance. Not insane to do something real about the problem. I do not believe what was PuSHED through will make any difference in how you will feel walking the beach.

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  5. I couldn't agree more. All pit bulls should be muzzled in public and the owners should be required to register them with city hall. Pit bulls are dangerous, no matter what anyone says. I am sick of the rights of dogs being put above the rights of people to be safe in their own community. Once the city starts collecting fines from unmuzzled and unregistered pit bulls they can afford to hire more animal control staff.

    Mike

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  6. what would muzzle mean?
    yesterday I saw a happy pitbull walking with his friendly owner, and the dog had a 'stick' in his mouth (meant for dogs), much friendlier than a muzzle.

    It seems this allows the dog to behave as normal. This lets the dog open his mouth, let his tongue hang out... drink water, but prevents a bite down.

    I'm not an expert... but this seems brilliant?

    ......
    I'm happy the council is thinking of an ordinance to minimize the impact of strip clubs.

    I wish there was an ordinance to revive the 'burnt district'. then there would be no battle now fighting new construction.

    i wish there was an ordinance preventing a big box from entering the highlands and to respect the historic fabric of the victorian neighborhoods and views to and from high rock. then some of us wouldn't have to fight KIPP.
    ......

    The best thing the Mayor did for this city is allow each culture to raise their flag. This gained the respect of each culture... especially one specific one which is known to have the highest amount of drug dealings in this city.

    Gangs are helping clean parks. (wow!)

    Youth summer jobs and afterschool activities are increasing. (reaching for those troubled teens)

    empty your medicine cabinets program...

    Lets keep the positive vibes going! Love everyone's hard work at it!!!

    not to forget:
    the ordinance for no more papers and such sold in stores.
    no more texting while driving.
    & the investigative force increased (cool)

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  7. http://www.doctordog.com/drdognewsletter/tongue2.html

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  8. In the beginning of this debate, I had a hard time coming to terms with the fact that pit bulls should be singled out as a dangerous breed and that a muzzle ordinance was the solution to everyone's fears. My thinking and opinion has changed 180 degrees.

    This evening (Saturday, 8/28 @ 6pm), I took my dog for the ritual pre-dinner potty break. It was a nice day and I figured a walk would be good for the both of us until..... a very large, drooling, unmuzzled, unleashed and unchaperoned pit bull was in our line of sight in Central Square. I've had previous experience with pit bulls before and can talk all day long about how it's the owner/not the dog discussion. But, I come from a place as a responsible owner and understand that there are a lot of dog breeds, including pit bulls, that are prone to aggresive behavior. My experience with pit bulls and owners in the city of Lynn has been mostly not-so-positive: dogs used as status symbols and "protection".

    I wasn't sure where the dog was headed, but my first instinct was to get out of the dog's sight and call the police. I would applaud the LPD coming out to pick up the dog and detain it. I was standing outside with a neighbor at the time who alerted me to the fact the pit bull had made contact with my [12 lb] dog and made his way across the street. Maybe he wanted to come over and make a new friend. Maybe he saw my dog and me as a snack. I wasn't going to stand around to find out. I quickly entered my building and watched to see where the dog would head to next.

    Four calls were made to the LPD (two from me and two by other neighbors) and I hope that they catch this dog and reprimand the owners to whatever extent the law allows. It's going to make me look both ways before I head out to take my dog out.

    With all of this said, I am very much in favor of muzzling and stronger licensing requirements for ALL animals in this city.

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  9. If that's the case, I'm tempted to start frequenting City Hall and casually inquiring about the zoning for absurd things like cannibalism, whaling, and trepanation clinics, just to watch the new ordinances get written.

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  10. We already have laws to prevent this. The ordinance does not require a muzzle while the pitbull is home. This dog obviously got free from somewhere. The real issue you just experienced is our lack of animal control. We have one dog officer in a city of 90,000 people. ONE! Did the council fix that problem? No.

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  11. A couple of years ago, on a lovely Easter Sunday, I took my dogs for a walk along Lynn Shore Drive. As we headed home, we saw an obviously sick skunk on Bassett St.; the neighbors said it had been present for awhile, a police cruiser had even driven by to take a gander.

    An hour or so later, I headed out again on another stroll. Lo an behold, still possibly rabid skunk ambling down the street. This was too much, I drove over, captured the skunk, and the Animal Control Officer eventually showed up even though he was not scheduled to be working.

    The inattentiveness of the Police involving an actual health and safety issue when it involves an animal concerns me. They should be proactive.

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  12. Of course, muzzling at home would be a bit ridiculous since it's assumed an owner would have control over their pet within the confines of their home. It's when any breed demonstrates aggression towards other aninals or people--whether a pit bull or chihuahua. In the end, each individual has their own perception of aggressive behavior. The thug walking down the street with a pit bull in a leather harness with a choke collar and chain may think his pooch is the sweetest dog and wouldn't hurt anyone/thing. All of the "hardware" could be just decoration. Who knows... All I know that pet owners in this city need to be more responsible for their pets (ie. registering/licensing, vaccinations, keeping on leash). Here's a thought.....how about if vets partner with the city to ensure that animals they treat are licensed?

    I'm sure in the end, a solid resolution won't come from this debate since (a) it sounds like it's a waste of time to discuss and (b) how can any action be enforced with limited city resources.

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  13. I think (b) is a good reason to be discussing this and I am hopeful that the increased attention on this is causing City Hall to take a harder look. Last I heard, the mayor was working with Swampscott on a possible resource share to get more animal control resources in our city. This is a step in the right direction.

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